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6 Prominent Scat Singers

Do you want to know 6 Prominent Scat Singers? If your answer is yes then this blog provides you all information regarding this.

What Exactly Is Scatting?

Scatting is a type of jazz vocal improvisation that includes wordless singing. Scat vocalists use vocables or sounds to improvise riffs or recurring melodic patterns in a jazz tune, akin to a musical instrument solo. Scat musicians forego sheet music in favor of singing scat syllables that serve as substitutes for known phrases, such as “uh-huh” for “yes,” or nonsensical syllables like “shoo-bee-doo.”

Scatting’s Brief History

Scat singing has roots in West African traditions, according to musicologists, while present scatting has roots in jazz history.

• Origins: Jelly Roll Morton, a New Orleans musician, claimed to have used scat singing in public concerts as early as 1906. In the early twentieth century, other pioneering jazz musicians, like pianist Tony Jackson, incorporated scatting in their performances.

• The 1926 performance of trumpeter and jazz singer Louis Armstrong’s “Heebie Jeebies” is one of the earliest significant tunes to include scat syllables.

Scatting grew in popularity during the bop and bebop eras in the 1940s and 1950s. Other jazz vocalists, such as Dizzy Gillespie, Anita O’Day, and bandleaders Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway, included scat choruses in their jazz vocal repertoires. Singers like Jon Hendricks and Eddie Jefferson created a style of jazz singing known as vocalese during this time. Vocalese is not the same as scatting; vocalese singers mimic jazz instrumentalists’ solos with recognizable vocabulary, whilst scat singers utilize meaningless words.

• Today: In the 1960s and 1970s, entertainer Mel Tormé used scatting in his jazz vocals, while John Paul Larkin—also known as Scatman John—brought scatting to dance, pop, and hip-hop sounds. Scat vocalist Bobby McFerrin is currently active.

6 Notable Scat Singers

A lot of great jazz vocalists use scat solos in their performances. Among the most well-known scat soloists and singers are the following:

1. Betty Carter: A Grammy Award winner and recipient of the National Medal of the Arts, Betty Carter honed her scat vocal skills while working with jazz musicians such as Charlie Parker and Lionel Hampton.

2. Ella Fitzgerald: Remembered as the “First Lady of Song,” Ella Fitzgerald is most known for her performance of the jazz standard “How High the Moon,” which can be found on the live CD Ella in Berlin: Mack the Knife. Fitzgerald’s distinctive scatting style is featured in the song. In the song, her rolling voice creates intricate melodic solos that resemble the range and tones of brass instruments such as the saxophone.

3. Kurt Elling, a Chicago-born vocalist Kurt Elling is a well-known scat singer from around the world.

4. Theodore Leo Watson Watson was a well-known scat vocalist who also played drums and trombone for Artie Shaw and Gene Krupa’s big bands. His scat singing was his trademark.

5. Mark Murphy: New York singer Mark Murphy’s fast scat singing may be heard on more than fifty of his CDs over the course of his long career.

6. Sarah Vaughan: Vaughan’s ability to scale three octaves contributed to the scat idiom’s growth. Her one-of-a-kind scat phrases blended beautifully with the brass instrument solos.

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